How does procurement work?

Energy Management are experts in two types of procurement – water and energy.

Water procurement

In April 2017, the department for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) introduced major changes to the water and sewage market, opening it up to competition. Our in-house expertise in water procurement, allied to investment in new systems, means we are best placed to help you take advantage of increased competition.

We have a proven track record in negotiating deals however big or small, both in terms of price and improved service level as well as gaining improved control over your water bills.

There are many suppliers to choose from which has resulted in improved service overall and reductions in cost. Energy Management LLP help businesses to make informed decisions that will meet their individual needs.

Water rates are fixed for the year and get reviewed every 5 years (Amp). This is due to be reviewed next April, which could make it more competitive.

What we can do for you?

  • Leak detection
  • Invoice validation
  • Trade effluent
  • Highway surface drainage banding size – this is set by the wholesaler and can be wrong
  • Meter replacement – organising site visits, old and new meters
  • Consumption and leak monitoring:

Water pipe leaks can go undetected for months or years, as a team we can help coordinate on-site leak protection surveys – checking meters buried in the ground, as well as installing remotely accessible metering.

Energy procurement

Energy procurement in the simplest format is the process of finding the best energy recommendation for your business. This considers price, sustainability, renewables and the future needs of your business. We use our own specialist knowledge, analysis expertise and market intelligence to bring you the best solution.

We monitor your contract so that we can be proactive when sourcing you a new deal, whether this is for Fullflex, mid-flex or fixed-price contracts.

What can we do for you?

  • Search once for all the major energy suppliers
  • Extended fixed pricing for up to 60months
  • No sign-up, no commitment required
  • Potentially saving your business £1,000s
  • Business energy procurement specialists
  • Market intelligence:

We make decisions based on hard data and excellent communication between ourselves and the customer. We watch the markets on a daily business, watching trends and technologies identifying opportunities to improve performance above and beyond expectations.

If you want to gain more market knowledge on a monthly basis then please subscribe to our market intelligence report by filling in the brief form found at the bottom of the home page on our website. It provides you with the latest market insights on Electricity, Gas and Water.

To discuss energy procurement with one of our team further please contact via email: sales@energymanagementltd.com or call: 01225 867722

Heat under our feet, Cardiff groundwater study reveals

Natural water in the ground could be used as a low-carbon heat source in many towns and cities, according to research from the British Geological Survey (BGS).

Data gathered from a natural ground-water system below Cardiff has resulted in the BGS calling for more research to see if similar technology can be used on a larger scale.

The findings are based on data from a three-year-long study at one of the UK Geoenergy Observatories, a network of sites being created across the country to research new and alternative energy supplies in the subsurface.

The £300 000 study was funded by Innovate UK, the BGS, WDS Green Energy Ltd and, more recently, the European Commission, to examine the environmental impact of a pilot groundwater heating scheme that heats a school building in the Welsh capital using the warmth stored in the natural water system below ground (an aquifer) and electric heat pumps.

Natural system

Data from the natural groundwater system below Cardiff is being collected by the Urban Geo Observatory, a network of 61 boreholes equipped with temperature and water-level sensors, to build up a picture of the groundwater temperatures in the aquifer found just ten metres below the ground surface.

BGS research lead David Boon said: “We knew that the use of ground-source heat pumps changes the ground temperature by several degrees Celsius. What we didn’t know was by how much.”

A study of the data collected between 2015 and 2018 indicates that the large heat resources stored in the UK’s underground water systems could sustain ‘shallow open-loop ground-source heat pump systems’, which are a low-carbon heating approach widely used in European cities that are being used more frequently for heating the UK’s building stock.

Low-carbon

Boon added: “Our findings prove that groundwater-source heat pumps are a technically viable, low-carbon heating solution in many towns and cities across the UK, providing the geology beneath the surface is favourable.

“Of course, regulation and long-term planning will be needed to manage this emerging energy technology so that larger and more complex schemes can be rolled out in our cities without “draining” the underground heat source.”

While there are physical limits to how much water and heat can be abstracted and reinjected, and regulatory legal limits on temperature drops, the BGS’s findings confirm that even a small quantity of heat from a very large volume of water provides a low-carbon heating solution for many UK towns and cities.

The solution could be applied in district-wide heat networks, homes or commercial buildings.

How could it be used to heat our homes and workplaces?

  • Hot water and steam from deep underground can be used to drive turbines
  • It can also be used to heat buildings directly
  • Potentially a source of renewable energy with no carbon footprint

Mr Boon added: “A well-balanced combination of groundwater-source heat pumps in tandem with vertical, closed-loop ground-source heat pumps and air-source heat pumps will maximise the options for decarbonising heating in UK homes and businesses.”

Image by Roegger from Pixabay

Droughts likely in the North of England in 15 years

Effective water management has never been more important as global warming takes hold.

In 15 years’ time, it is probable that demand for water in the North of England will surpass supply, potentially resulting in water shortages across the region which would leave households and businesses in turmoil.

Currently, the North has an abundance of water but with a changing climate and rise in global temperatures forecast to cause a reduction in rainfall on top of popualtion growth, we could be getting to the tipping point sooner rather than later.

Soon, as is the case in the South East and London, in particular, areas of the North might have to transport water from other areas of the country where there is still a surplus.

The transport of water though brings about lots of issues with water leaks and can result in large volumes of water loss unless leaks are fixed proficiently by water companies.

A recent report by IPPR North warns that efforts to stop leaks might not be enough and water use must be reduced to avoid likely droughts in the near future. The average water usage in the UK is significantly higher than in other countries in Europe despite an approximate 40% decrease in leakages since the 1990s.

As the North relies more on surface water than other parts of the country, it could be greater affected by the drier climate.

The Environment Agency is apprehensive about the future and proposes that unless public attitudes change, and drastic action is taken to stop leaks then a water shortage is very likely.

If the imminent drought materialises, costly reservoirs might have to be built in order to increase the supply of water to the North of England and this may translate to a higher price of water to the consumer.

If your water contract is up for renewal or you just need advice on how to manage your water supply more effectively, you can contact a member of our team now on: 01225-867722 or alternatively email sales@energymanagementltd.com.